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See the discussion of "dollars per mile of track" including the question of exactly where do the Sierra Nevada mountains begin and end. Graves states that the 1887 Pacific RR Commission said the cost of construction from Sacramento City to Promontory, as of July, 1869 was ,249,916.11; cash or cash equivalent was ,397,135.58.See comments regarding the role of the government in financing the transcontinental railroad. The bonds were sold at par in New York, then transferred to San Francisco where they were converted to cash/gold.I would think that [the above] estimate of approximately 200,000 tons of iron, just for the track, is as close as you will ever get without access to the original records scattered in archives across the country, and then it is doubtful they are even close to being complete.On the matter of engines, there was 159 engines built for the CPRR between 1863 and May 1869 and 152 engines built for the UPRR during the same period.rails, equal to 3,384,360 pounds.' but when he weighed those rails ' ...they weigh 3,355,170 pounds-which is 29,190 pounds less than your invoice ...' ...Total engine weight would be about 10,000 tons or so.

The first approximately 112 miles of railvaried in weight from60 to 66 lb pattern, that is 60 to 66 lbsper lineal yard.

About 200,000 net tons of iron total were used just for building the railroad from Omaha to Sacramento [at 2000 lbs/net ton, the modern useage, also called the short ton; the metric ton = 1000 kg ].

Details, at 60 lb/yard (per single rail) single track from Omaha to Sacramento: 1776 miles x 60 lb/yard x 5280 feet/mile x 1/3 yards/feet x 2 rails x 1/2000 ton/lb = (1776*60*5280*2)/(3*2000) = 187,546 tons of iron.

1, 1899, and that the complex transaction was completed on February 1, 1909 when the last of the government debt was duly paid.

How much iron and lumber was used in the construction of the transcontinental railroad?

The greatest amount of lumber used for one project was the 37 miles of Snow Sheds, as mentioned above.

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